Who Was Charlotte Mason

…and why is she so important to Love2Learn Curriculum?

 

Charlotte Mason was born in England in 1842. She was a passionate, innovative educator and the founder of the Christian homeschooling movement in the United Kingdom. She developed a unique philosophy of education that was way ahead of its time and, in our opinion, still is today! Love2Learn Curriculum actively seeks to implement these timeless ideas and educational beliefs.

Her philosophy was created for private schools as well as homeschools. She believed that children should have a broad, rich and varied education and be allowed to reach their full potential.

There are THREE MAIN PILLARS of Charlotte Mason philosophy which we seek to implement.

1. Education is an ATMOSPHERE.
2. Education is a DISCIPLINE.
3. Education is a LIFE.

CM believed that children should have a “broad, rich and varied education and be allowed to reach their full potential.”

Spoon-feeding:
Great for babies –
Hazardous to education!

1. Education is an ATMOSPHERE

What exactly did Charlotte Mason mean, when she said “Education is an Atmosphere”?
Simply put it is not meant that a child should be isolated in what may be called a “child environment” especially adapted and prepared; but that we should take into account the educational value of his natural home atmosphere, and let him live freely among his proper conditions. “It stultifies a child to bring down his world to a child’s level.” Charlotte Mason.
The preparation of knowledge in enticing morsels, presented in due order results in children being in danger of receiving much teaching with little knowledge!
Spoon-feeding: Great for babies – Hazardous to education!

At Love2Learn we believe that children are far more capable than is generally given them credit! We have seen, time and time again, how children rise to the occasion when presented with meaty material!

Love2Learn Curriculum is not a soft diet! It is meat, not milk, and it is presented in such as manner as to demand a healthy degree of critical thinking. We endeavour to hold true to both Charlotte Mason’s and Classical Education’s teaching in this area, and we trust you will encounter challenging, but appropriate material each day, in the type and level of books prescribed

“It stultifies a child to bring down his world to a child’s level.”
– CM.

“The mother who takes pains to endow her children with good habits secures for herself
smooth and easy days; while she who lets their habits take care of themselves has a life of endless friction with her children.”
– Charlotte Mason

2. Education is a DISCIPLINE.

 The discipline of habits formed definitely and thoughtfully, whether habits of mind or body.

“It is as much the parent’s duty to educate his child into moral strength and purpose and intellectual activity as it is to feed him and clothe him; and in spite of his nature, if it must be so…The problem before the educator is to give the child control over his own nature, to enable him to hold himself in hand. The education of habit is successful in so far as it enables the mother to let her children alone, not teasing them with perpetual commands and directions, but letting them go their own way and grow, having first secured that they will go the right way and grow to fruitful purpose.” Charlotte Mason
“He who spares the rod hates his son, but he who loves him is careful to discipline him.” Proverbs 13:24
The mother who takes pains to endow her children with good habits secures for herself
smooth and easy days; while she who lets their habits take care of themselves has a life of endless friction with her children.” Charlotte Mason

“He who spares the rod hates his son, but he who loves him is careful to discipline him.”
Proverbs 13:24

A “living” book  is a book that makes a child WANT to turn the page…
It
the captures the imagination and captivates and escalates a child to new planes and levels of thinking!

3. Education is a LIFE

The need of intellectual and moral as well as of physical sustenance.
“The mind feeds on ideas and therefore children should have a generous curriculum. Ideas must reach us directly from the mind of the thinker, and it is chiefly by means of the books they have written that we get in touch with the best minds.

These ideas are presented in what Charlotte Mason called “living books”.